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Fig. 3 | Large-scale Assessments in Education

Fig. 3

From: The measure of socio-economic status in PISA: a review and some suggested improvements

Fig. 3

(Source: PISA 2000–2015 database)

Percentage of respondents with missing ISCO codes for parental occupation. Share of missing values for fathers’ (left) and mothers’ (right) occupation codes. The figure represents the median, interquartile range (shaded area) and adjacent values for country-level missing rates in OCOD2 (Father ISCO code) and OCOD1 (Mother ISCO code). Adjacent values are defined as the most extreme missing rates within 1.5 times the interquartile range from the nearest quartile. The following countries have missing rates that exceed the upper adjacent value: Fathers: 2000: Israel (31.1), Japan (65.0), United States (28.3); 2003: Japan (25.4); 2006: Israel (21.7), Japan (22.0), Qatar (44.8); 2009: Georgia (30.3), Panama (25.3), Himachal Pradesh (India) (32.8), Tamil Nadu (India) (26.3); 2012: Albania (31.7), Austria (100), Japan (26.8); 2015: none. Mothers: 2000: Brasil (26.7), Israel (25.5), Japan (66.5), United States (23.1); 2003: Canada (16.4), Germany (16.7), Japan (21.3), Netherlands (15.8), New Zealand (17.8); 2006: Israel (16.5), Japan (16.3), Qatar (31.4); 2009: Canada (16.8), Germany (16.7), Japan (16.2), QTN (24.8); 2012: Albania (27.4), Austria (100), Germany (22.3); 2015: Algeria (74.8), United Kingdom (28.3), Chinese Taipei (37.0), Thailand (29.1), Tunisia (66.2)

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